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attackofthewh0res:


I call bullshit. Fuck this blog.

There is no need for that. We can be civil about this, I’m sure.
I don’t generally post things that aren’t “real” words—that don’t have some established history of meaning what I’m using them to mean. I usually do pretty solid check-ups on the backgrounds of words before I post them.
However, I am a human being, and I do make mistakes. As I’ve only just discovered, nelipot isn’t precisely a word. It doesn’t appear in any dictionaries, old or new, and I can’t find citations for a first usage in any text. I didn’t catch this at first and went ahead with the post. This is a Mistake. I admit to having made it. I am very sorry.
But, guys, I advise against using Dictionary.com to decide whether this blog is BS or not. (I also advise against using one post out of 300+ to decide whether this blog is BS or not. Statistics, you know.)
Try finding any of the words on this blog in an English dictionary. Your chances are maybe 60%. Why? This blog’s about strange words, foreign words—many of them aren’t even English. Some of them are so obscure or obsolete that they won’t show up in a modern dictionary. Some of them only appear in full-edition print dictionaries, not online ones.
Indagatrix? Dictionary.com has never heard of it. But it was printed in the Oxford English Dictionary, and don’t tell me you’re going to try and argue with the OED. Resistentialism? Also crap, according to Dictionary.com, but it was coined in 1948 and has since entered into common usage.
Don’t all words start as nonsense? Don’t all words start as sounds that someone assigns to an idea? Words become real words when people hear them and like them and repeat them until other people know what they mean.
I love the word nelipot, and since there is some evidence of usage and its etymology can be solidly traced back to the Greek for “barefoot”, I’m leaving it up. And I hope everyone who enjoys it uses it as often as possible when they talk or write. Not every jumble of sounds deserves to be a word, but when one does— make it a real word if you must.

attackofthewh0res:

I call bullshit. Fuck this blog.

There is no need for that. We can be civil about this, I’m sure.

I don’t generally post things that aren’t “real” words—that don’t have some established history of meaning what I’m using them to mean. I usually do pretty solid check-ups on the backgrounds of words before I post them.

However, I am a human being, and I do make mistakes. As I’ve only just discovered, nelipot isn’t precisely a word. It doesn’t appear in any dictionaries, old or new, and I can’t find citations for a first usage in any text. I didn’t catch this at first and went ahead with the post. This is a Mistake. I admit to having made it. I am very sorry.

But, guys, I advise against using Dictionary.com to decide whether this blog is BS or not. (I also advise against using one post out of 300+ to decide whether this blog is BS or not. Statistics, you know.)

Try finding any of the words on this blog in an English dictionary. Your chances are maybe 60%. Why? This blog’s about strange words, foreign words—many of them aren’t even English. Some of them are so obscure or obsolete that they won’t show up in a modern dictionary. Some of them only appear in full-edition print dictionaries, not online ones.

Indagatrix? Dictionary.com has never heard of it. But it was printed in the Oxford English Dictionary, and don’t tell me you’re going to try and argue with the OED. Resistentialism? Also crap, according to Dictionary.com, but it was coined in 1948 and has since entered into common usage.

Don’t all words start as nonsense? Don’t all words start as sounds that someone assigns to an idea? Words become real words when people hear them and like them and repeat them until other people know what they mean.

I love the word nelipot, and since there is some evidence of usage and its etymology can be solidly traced back to the Greek for “barefoot”, I’m leaving it up. And I hope everyone who enjoys it uses it as often as possible when they talk or write. Not every jumble of sounds deserves to be a word, but when one does— make it a real word if you must.

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